Dairy farmers show their best at fair

| October 1, 2013
Kamryn McGinnis brought her one-month-old calf to the Dairy Show at the Coshocton County Fair on Tuesday, Oct. 1. Kamryn is seven years old and attends River View School District.

Kamryn McGinnis brought her one-month-old calf to the Dairy Show at the Coshocton County Fair on Tuesday, Oct. 1. Kamryn is seven years old and attends River View School District.

COSHOCTON – Members of Coshocton County 4-H clubs and their families showcased the best of the best today at the Open Class Dairy Show at the Coshocton County Fair. Dairy farmers lead busy lives, but they farm because they love the work and wouldn’t have it any other way.

Dean Wyler has been a dairy farmer all of his life. Now in his mid-80s, Dean still milks cows every morning at 7 a.m.

“I love it,” said Dean. “If I had my life to live over again, I would milk cows. It’s a challenge every day. I’ve been milking cows since I was six years old and I still milk cows every morning.”

Although he doesn’t milk them in the evenings, Dean still likes to sit and watch his grandsons milk the cows. He has seen a lot of changes during his years as a dairy farmer, and the best change in his opinion is the advantages of artificial insemination because farmers can use the best bulls for breeding. He also mentioned the way farmers milk the cows and transportation of milk has changed with the use of technology.

Dean’s favorite memory from being a dairy farmer over the years is showing at the county fair.

“When I was showing, those were the most memorable times for me,” said Dean. “Showing at the fair.”

Dean also has a very positive outlook on dairy farming in the county.

“I think dairy farming has a great future in Coshocton County,” he said.

Terry Mizer has been showing at the fair ever since he was in 4-H, and now his son, Cameron, has followed in his footsteps.

“I just enjoy it,” said Terry. “It’s good competition and good friends. Everybody knows everybody else. The main reason I do it is because I like it. It’s the kind of life I like, to work outside, to work for yourself, and to provide a good, wholesome product for everyone else.”

The Mizers start the day at 4:30 a.m. when the cows are fed. Milking begins at 5 a.m., and the Mizers milk 76 – 78 cows daily. Milking usually lasts until 9 a.m. After a long day of other chores around the farm, milking begins again at 4 p.m. and lasts until about 7 p.m.

To prepare for the showing, Terry and his family try to make the cow look her best by washing and clipping her for the judges. Judges at the Dairy Show look for good, tall, uniformed dairy character, utters that are even and attached well to the animal, walking on straight legs, and good general appearance.

“We’ve been here for a long time, as has everyone else here,” said Terry. “We try to do our best to take care of our animals and provide a good, wholesome product for the public whether it be ice cream, cottage cheese, or anything else made from milk.”

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About the Author ()

I have been employed at the Coshocton County Beacon since September 2009 as a news reporter and assistant graphic artist. I am a 2004 graduate of Newcomerstown High School and a 2008 graduate of Capital University with a bachelor’s degree in Professional Writing. I am married to John Scott and live in Newcomerstown. We have two beautiful daughters, Amelia Grace Scott and Leanna Rose Scott.

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