Hand-made star still lights up Lapp family farm

| December 24, 2015
STAR: This hand-made star lights the night sky on US 36 toward Warsaw from Thanksgiving night through New Year’s. The star, made in 1979 by Warren Lapp who lives on the farm, has graced the top of their 100-foot grain leg for the past 36 years. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED TO THE BEACON

STAR: This hand-made star lights the night sky on US 36 toward Warsaw from Thanksgiving night through New Year’s. The star, made in 1979 by Warren Lapp who lives on the farm, has graced the top of their 100-foot grain leg for the past 36 years. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED TO THE BEACON

COSHOCTON – Since 1979, drivers on US 36 toward Warsaw have seen a bright star light up the sky each night during the holiday season. For many, that star has become a long-standing tradition that they look forward to each year.

Warren Lapp made the 5 by 5 foot star that has graced the top of one of the 100-foot grain legs the Lapps have on their farm for the past 36 years. The star is made from one-half inch rebar wire, due to its flexibility, and was welded together by Lapp. Lapp said he drew the outline of a star with chalk on the floor of his garage, cut the wire to that specific shape, welded the pieces together, and strung it with lights. The star features 50 bulbs and was recently switched to LED lights.

“One year, we accidentally bought flashing bulbs and didn’t realize it until we plugged it in,” said Dorothy, Warren’s wife. “We had to go through and take out all those lights and replace them. We left one flashing bulb in by mistake, so that year, there was one flashing bulb on the star.”

The star is placed atop the grain bin each year usually on Thanksgiving night. Sometimes, due to bad weather, the star isn’t placed until later, but people notice if the star is missing.

“Some years, we’ve put it up late and we’ve had people ask us when we’re going to put it up,” said Warren.

The star is placed on top of the grain leg with the help of at least two people, one on top of the leg and one at the bottom. A rope is tied around the star to hoist it up to the top, and another rope is used to help steady the star so it doesn’t knock into the grain leg and become damaged.

A timer is used to turn the star on and off each night and early in the morning. The Lapps leave the star on all night on Christmas Eve, and take it down after New Year’s.

“It brings joy to people passing through,” said Dorothy. “We’ve had a lot of people make comments. We’ve enjoyed it and many others have too. It’s something our kids look forward to every year.”

The star can be seen on US 36 toward Warsaw lighting the night sky now until after New Year’s. The Lapp Family Farm is located beside Mission Auto Connection.

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About the Author ()

I have been employed at the Coshocton County Beacon since September 2009 as a news reporter and assistant graphic artist. I am a 2004 graduate of Newcomerstown High School and a 2008 graduate of Capital University with a bachelor’s degree in Professional Writing. I am married to John Scott and live in Newcomerstown. We have two beautiful daughters, Amelia Grace Scott and Leanna Rose Scott.

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