It’s a crazy, crazy, crazy world

| March 24, 2022

To say that the world situation is deteriorating rapidly would be an understatement of the largest magnitude. What started out as a seemingly innocuous movement of Russian troops to the Ukrainian border for “military exercises” has proven to be – as most people with half a brain knew would happen – a large-scale invasion of a sovereign nation. Regardless of how you feel about the situation, it will have global ramifications that have yet to be seen.

The question that does not seem to be bubbling up quite yet, is, who will pay for the reconstruction of the crushed and demolished apartment buildings, roads, bridges, hospitals and everything else the Russians have destroyed? The U.N.? Us? The European Union? Russia? Without proper housing, the millions of refugees (and probably millions more) will not be able to return to Ukraine and pick up what is left of their lives. When this first happened, I thought to myself, “Is this 1940 or the year 2022?”

Everyone has their opinion on whether we (the U.S.) should be more involved – or not. Putting boots on the ground brings an escalation of the conflict that the world does not want.

Despite all the negative and far-reaching tentacles of this conflict, we must remain hopeful that cooler heads will prevail for a peaceful resolution before Ukraine is destroyed.

Spring is here! Finally. Did it seem like a long winter or is that just my age showing? I no longer wonder why people a tad older than me (lol) head south for the long, cold and gray months. That doesn’t mean I have any intentions of following – but I can see the appeal of a warmer climate and sunshine.

If you watched any of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament over the weekend – you know that the Big 10 conference made a better showing than in past years. While the Buckeyes failed to make the Sweet 16 – they did put up a solid fight. The injuries to key players and bringing them back for tournament time would be a challenge for any team and coach.

The excitement of seeing the “little guy” or in the case of the women’s tournament – “the little girl,” notch a win over the favorite from the power conference is enjoyable – I think because it lets us believe in what is possible. As Americans, we seem to have a long-held tradition of rooting for the underdog – and to be politically animal non favorite – the undercat. Of course, this is true in sports and life in general. That’s probably why most Americans are pulling for the people and forces of Ukraine.

It could also be because we still possess a sense of right and wrong on the world stage.

To sum up this week’s column, what are the Browns thinking? Someone please tell me. I am as baffled about the quarterback decision as I am wondering what happens to paperclips, gravel on the driveway and other such oddities in life.

Category: Mark's Musings, Opinion

About the Author ()

I live with my beautiful wife Nancy on a small farm just outside Coshocton. We have been married for thirty two years and have two grown children, Jessica and Jacob. Jessica is married to Aaron Mencer and they are employed with Coshocton City Schools. Jacob is a sophomore at Kent State University. I graduated from River View High School, have a Bachelor’s Degree from North Carolina Wesleyan University and am actively involved with the Roscoe United Methodist Church, serve on several local committees and am a member of the Coshocton Kiwanis Club, having served as Past-President. I love reading, especially military thrillers, the Civil War and history in general. My goal is to write a novel. My wife and I are also AdvoCare distributors and encourage anyone wanting to lose weight, gain energy and better health to explore AdvoCare at our website; www.fortunes4advocare.com. I love the media field, innovative technology and have worked in newspapers for over 30 years – in fact, my first job was delivering newspapers. The Beacon is a dream made possible by the support of this community and a great team. I hope to continue serving Coshocton County for many years.

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